Business Directory: Historic Haymarket Tour

Armour & Co. Building

Armour & Co. Building

Categories: Learn, Historic Haymarket Tour
Address: 800 O Street (Map)
Additional Info:

Year Built: 1911
Architect: R. C. Clark, architect

The small utilitarian building at the northeast corner of 8th and ‘O’ was built in 1911 for Armour & Co., the meat packers.  A close examination reveals surprisingly fine materials, such as the tooled limestone trim and openwork steel trusses supporting the canopy.  R. C. Clark of Chicago was the architect and Gerstenberger & Gooden the constructors for the $24,000 building.  Earlier structures on the site included a succession of small hotels. 

If you walk east along ‘O’ Street beyond the Armour Building, across the parking lot behind the building you will see fragments of surprisingly colorful painted wall signs.  They have survived so well because they were protected for years by a building which has since been demolished.

Beatrice Creamery Building

Beatrice Creamery Building

Categories: Learn, Historic Haymarket Tour
Address: 701 P Street (Map)
Additional Info:

Year Built: 1980/1904
Architect: Unknown

Originally constructed in 1890 as the twp-story Fitzgerald Building, this structure received its upper floors in 1904- - a very early example of a common Haymarket occurrence.  The building’s most prominent occupant was the Beatrice Creamery Company, which was headquartered here from the late 1890s until 1911.  William Henry Ferguson, one of the pioneering industrialists in Lincoln, was a major stockholder and officer in Beatrice Creamery.  The company moved its headquarters to Chicago in the early 1910s and grew there into Beatrice Foods, a major food processor and more recently, a diversified conglomerate.  Cornell Supply Company, a wholesale plumbing and heating concern, moved into the building in 1911 and occupied it until the 1940s. 

When Beatrice added the top floors in 1904, a Lincoln newspaper described the building as ‘one of the handsomest factories’ in the city, featuring ‘granite colored hydraulic pressed brick.’  The effects of paint and time may obscure that handsomeness on the north façade, but around the west side toward the railyard, fine iron trim and brickwork arches make the early description more plausible.  The building’s location is one of the most prominent in the district, at the southern end of the wide portion of 7th Street that serves as a forecourt to Burlington Depot.

Current Tenants:
Ivanna Cone
Paint Yourself Silly
TADA Productions
Indigo Bridge Books
Abesque Variations

Bennett Hotel

Bennett Hotel

Categories: Learn, Historic Haymarket Tour
Address: 700 P Street (Map)
Additional Info:

Year Built: 1915
Architect:  J. G. Cordner

An early settler’s cottonwood-timber house stood on this site from 1867 to 1915.  Due to its proximity to the railroad depot, the house became a hotel in 1871, operating under the names Midland Pacific, National, and Mooney’s.  John Bennett’s new brick hotel, which included a restaurant on the ground floor and thirty small guest rooms above, cost about $20,000 to build in 1915.  Its century-old functions did not change until the building’s handsome rehabilitation in 1984-85.  ‘Haymarket Junction, ’  a collection of retail shops, was designed by architect Rich Reeves.

Bird Windmill Building

Bird Windmill Building

Categories: Learn, Historic Haymarket Tour
Address: 119 S. 9th Street (Map)
Additional Info:

Year Built: 1883
Architect: Unknown

The Bird Windmill Company sold ‘Kalamazoo Wind Mills, ’ pumps, tanks and fittings for this building between 1883 and 1886, with 11 employees and annual sales exceeding $75,000.  A wholesale boot and shoe store occupied another part of the building, while the upper floor provided lodging rooms. 

The arched, upper floor windows set this building apart, as does ‘Haymarket Gallery’s’ status as the dean of Haymarket’s ‘new’ businesses.  Founded in 1968 and first located in the basement of the Lincoln Hotel, the gallery has occupied its present space since the early 1970s. 

The stone-paved alley south of the Gallery is the only intact example in the city of this handsome early paving method.

Burlington Northern Railroad Depot

Burlington Northern Railroad Depot

Categories: Learn, Historic Haymarket Tour
Address: 201-225 North 7th Street (Map)
Additional Info:

Year Built: 1927
Engineer: W. T. Krausch

Lincoln’s railroad era began in 1870, when the Burlington & Missouri River Railroad became the first line to enter the new capital.  Burlington’s first station was a small wooden structure located a few blocks northwest of the present depot.  The second station, a handsome Victorian Gothic structure of brick and stone, was built on the 7th and ‘P’ site in 1880-81 and replaced in 1927 with the current. Neo-classical Revival style depot.

Railroads were the lifelines of Midwestern towns when Lincoln was founded, and a top priority of the new capital’s leaders was to secure rail service.  Lincoln and Lancaster County voters approved substantial bonuses to the first railroad to read Lincoln by certain deadlines, but as a local newspaper editor observed, ‘It’s easier to vote bonds than to build railroads.’ For reaching Lincoln in July 1870, Burlington collected $50,000 from the county along with 2,000 acres of land per mile of track built from the state.  Seven more lines reached the city by 1900, for which the city and county paid bonuses totaling more than $500,000. 

The railroads were not attracted solely by the bonuses, but also by the opportunity to share in the city’s growing wholesale shipments.  In turn, the jobbing trade expanded as rail service increased, transforming the old retail and residential center of the city into a busy warehouse district. 

The 1927 depot is one of the few Haymarket buildings designed with equal attention to all four facades, for which credit much be given to W. T. Krausch, who signed the original blueprints as ‘Engineer of Buildings, ’ a good railroading title.  The east side, with its glass and cast iron canopies and limestone engaged Doric colonnade, is obviously the primary facade- - the simpler but similarly dignifies, befitting the rail passenger’s first glimpse of the city.  The stone trim is restricted on the west face to the corner quoines and the cornice, while brick pilasters take the place of the east’s stone columns.  The long, covered platforms on the west side are another fine feature of this station, which was built by Omaha-based Peter Kiewit and Sons, now a worldwide construction firm.  Inside, the central, tow-story waiting room retains its trim marble, terra cotta, and plaster.

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